Hospitals Taking Initiative to Be Accountable for Care

If health care reform fails, it won’t be for lack of trying by many of the nation’s leading health systems and their physician partners.  Although many hospitals are still trying to determine what the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act means for them, those on the leading edge are forging ahead.

One example: Fairview Health System in Minnesota.  Writing on the Action for Better Healthcare blog, Mike Stephens, former CEO at Hoag Memorial Presbyterian in Los Angeles, calls attention to Fairview’s efforts in six areas:

  1. Redesigning primary care around multi-disciplinary teams, patient engagement, and technology in Fairview’s 42 clinics
  2. Following “care packages” of best care practices designed by Fairview and University of Minnesota physicians
  3. Delivering care virtually over the Internet without a face-to-face interaction
  4. Collaborating with payers
  5. Collaborating with employers
  6. Using new technology to increase efficiency and improve outcomes.

Fairview has posted a summary of its efforts including a video on its public website.

Fairview is one of several systems profiled November 28  by the Wall Street Journal in an article entitled “Embracing Incentives for Efficient Health Care.”  Among the others, Tucson Medical Center is forming a company that the hospital will own jointly with local physicians’ practices to act as an Accountable Care Organization (ACO). The Billings Clinic in Montana, an integrated physician and hospital organization, is also preparing to take steps to become an ACO. The clinic hopes to build on lessons from an earlier Medicare pilot program in which the the clinic says it reduced hospital admissions for around 500 heart-failure patients by 35% to 43%, saving Medicare more than $3 million over three years. The efforts focused on close monitoring of patients who called in daily to provide measures like their weight.

We’ve written in the past about innovations at Advocate Physician Partners in Chicago. Advocate Physician Partners’ Clinical Integration Program unites over 3,600 independent and employed physicians and the eight Advocate hospitals in a nationally recognized program with improved clinical outcomes and reduced health care costs. Now, Advocate has announced a new educational symposium on February 24th that explains how its Clinical Integration Program works.  This is a pragmatic, practitioner-led symposium that can help others move forward to take accountability for value and outcomes.

Other sources of information include the Commonwealth Fund, American Hospital Association, and Great Boards.

The early adopters aren’t waiting for certainty from Washington. They are moving forward with integrated, accountable care, and many are sharing what they’re learning along the way. Other hospitals and health systems would be well-advised to take advantage.

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